Category Archives: Nabe

donabe-clay-pot-IH

Reader question: Clay nabe pots for IH flat top stoves

donabe-clay-pot-IHI received a question from a reader, John, about where to find clay nabe pots for flat top IH stoves. Sadly, his return email address didn’t work so I decided to post the answer here. I wrote a post three years ago when IH stoves were just becoming popular here. Now there are more available and more information to share.

What to look for on the box: IH対応土鍋 (IH taiou donabe)

An IH clay nabe pot will have a completely flat bottom, it won’t be rounded like the gas only ones. There may be a metal and/or ceramic insert that you need to use. The box will be clearly labelled as there were some accidents before people were aware that regular clay nabe pots were not okay to use.

You can even get this classic design that you have probably seen in every.single.supermarket.and.home.center.

donabe-clay-potWhere to get them:

 

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Shirataki – nabe’s good friend

I love shirataki in nabe. It must be the texture because it doesn’t really have a flavor once it is in something. I could do without the alcohol-like smell that appears when you first open the package. These babies are a dieters dream at 8 kcal per 100 gram package. That’s a few less than your average noodle. Just drain, rinse and add them to your favorite nabe and enjoy the firm jelly texture.

 

New Year's Nabe

New Year’s Nabe

My mother-in-law made this nabe on New Year’s Eve. It is not a traditional dish so you can make it anytime without feeling like you are infringing on something. I was at my in-laws for five days and I belive we ate nabe four times – I was in heaven.

The soup

fish stock (dashi)
a dash of cooking sake
salt

The add-ins

enoki mushrooms
Chinese cabbage
negi
gyoza
chicken
shirataki (devil’s tongue jelly noodles)
daikon radish

Dipping sauce

ponzu (likely yuzu flavored)

Leftover Nabe Casserole

This is how you can use up the leftover soup from nabe (hotpot) if you don’t drink it. I have always found the soup too strong to drink – especially kimchi nabe soup. this is a rice cooker recipe so it is super easy.

Leftover Nabe Casserole

leftover hotpot soup
whole grain of your choice
veggies to put in at the beginning (daikon radish, carrot, etc.)
veggies to add near the end (Chinese cabbage, nira, negi)

Measure how much soup you have and use that to decide how much whole grain to add. I used mostly barley with a little millet and quinoa thrown in. Put the soup, whole grains and root vegetables in the rice cooker and press start. When the timer shows ten minutes left add the leaf vegetables. When it beeps it is ready to serve.

Mackerel and Daikon Radish Hotpot

Mackerel (saba) was on special at the supermarket yesterday morning and I picked some up with no idea what I would make.  I used the Cookpad application on my iPhone and searched for mackerel and hotpot (in Japanese of course) and found this recipe.  I was a little skeptical about putting Chinese red chili oil (ra-yu) in hotpot – I’ve only had it in gyoza dipping sauce and in ramen before.  I thought I’d give it a try since I had all of the ingredients save the oil.  I loved it.  This may be my new favorite type of hotpot.  The only changes I made were to add some fresh shiitake mushrooms that were on sale today and put some frozen udon noodles in.

Mackerel and Daikon Radish Spicy Soy Sauce Hotpot

Posted by Cotton Street here (in Japanese)

2 mackerel fillets
1.5L of water
15cm of daikon radish
100cc soy sauce
3 tablespoons cooking sake
2 tablespoons mirin
1.5 tablespoons hondashi (fish stock) powder
2 teaspoons grated ginger
1 teaspoon salt
black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon Chinese red chili oil
6 shiitake mushrooms

Cut the mackerel fillets into four pieces each.  Cut the mushrooms in half.  Peel the daikon radish.  Use the peeler to turn the daikon radish into ribbons.  Put everything else except the oil, fish, daikon radish, noodles and mushrooms into a pot and bring to a boil.  Add the daikon radish ribbons and simmer for  a few minutes.  Add the udon noodles, mushrooms and fish and simmer until the fish looks 70% cooked (just a couple of minutes).  Remove from heat and serve.  Drizzle the chili oil over just before eating.  By the time you eat it the fish will be fully cooked.

Tsukune Nabe with Udon


I haven’t made this nabe in ages. I love the chicken meatballs (tsukune) they sell here in Japan. If I had had more time I would have made the meatballs from scratch but I was out all afternoon. I also used frozen udon noodles. Normally I would buy fresh but my husband found a really tasty frozen brand. I think I like it better than fresh.

Tsukune Nabe with Udon

Serves two

2 serving of udon noodles
8 tsukune (chicken balls)
10cm of daikon raddish, sliced and cut into six pieces
1 carrot, sliced and cut in half
2-3 Chinese cabbage leaves

Soup
800mL fish stock (I used hondashi)
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons mirin
2 tablespoons cooking sake

Mix the soup in a pot and add the daikon and carrots. Bring to a boil and simmer until they are almost cooked. Add the noodles, Chinese cabbage and meatballs. Cover and simmer for a few minutes until the meatballs are cooked. Serve.

Jouya Nabe (常夜鍋)

I’m back!  I’ve been without computer internet access for two weeks.  I’ve been confined to the iPhone and haven’t been able to post.  I could have, but I didn’t want to go back to iPhone pictures.

So far I have been making good on my vow to try a lot of new nabe recipes this year.  Last year the hubby and I ate kimchi nabe two or three times a week.  This is not a problem but I thought I must be missing out on something good by not trying new things.  This is another recipe from the Kyou no Ryouri Beginners Nabe issue.  Every recipe I’ve tried has been delicious and this was no exception.  The soup is really simple – just water and cooking sake.  The taste of the vegetables is heightened and the dipping sauce is a great compliment to the ingredients.

Jouya Nabe (常夜鍋)

Kyou no Ryouri Beginners (2008.01) p.8
Serves four (I made a half batch)
200g large pieces of thinly sliced pork (shabu shabu cut)
1/2 Chinese Cabbage
250g (one bunch) fresh spinach, washed
1 block firm tofu
1/2 cup cooking sake
1/2 teaspoon salt


Dipping Sauce
1 welsh onion (negi), sliced into 2mm slices
ponzu for the base

Cut the tofu into large cubes.  Cut the leaves of the Chinese cabbage into large squares and slice the spines thinly.  Leave the spinach whole.  Put four cups of water, the sake and the salt in a clay nabe pot or a soup pot and bring to a boil.  Add the tofu and Chinese cabbage spines and simmer for about five minutes or until the spines start to become translucent.  While the spines are cooking, slice the onion and place in individual dipping sauce bowls with ponzu.  Add the spinach and Chinese cabbage leaves.  Lay the pork slices on top and simmer on low until the pork is cooked.  Don’t forget to remove the scum.  When the pork is cooked, serve.

The recipe recommends using the leftover soup to make soumen and then topping it with the leftover dipping sauce. I didn’t have any soumen so we had rice with this nabe.  I will definitely try soumen next time.

If you are looking for more nabe recipes try ribbon vegetable nabe or cod and Chinese cabbage nabe.

Ribbon Vegetable Nabe (Hot Pot)

We are well into nabe (hot pot) season and I am trying to do more experimenting this year.  Last year we ate kimchi nabe a couple times a week.  That was a lot of days I could have been trying new things.  I even had a nice nabe cookbook at my disposal.  I have tried a few this year already (Cod and Chinese Cabbage Nabe) and I thought I’d share a good one that non-meat eaters could enjoy too.  I’m pretty sure that if you substituted vegetarian soup stock for chicken stock you wouldn’t find too much of a difference in taste.  As you can imagine, prep for this one takes a little while but it makes up for it in short cooking time.  If yo u are wondering about the color of the rice, I added a tablespoon of black rice to two cups of white rice in the rice cooker.

It was originally published in Japanese so I cannot guarantee what I did is exactly what the recipe called for but it worked and tasted great.

Ribbon Vegetable Nabe

Kyou no Ryouri Beginners 2008.1

1/3 carrot
15cm
daikon, cut in half lengthwise
1/4 lotus root (れんこん)
1 potato (a longish one works best)
1/2 burdock root (ごぼう)

1 1/2 cups fish stock
1 1/2 cups chicken stock
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon Thai fish sauce (ナムプラー)

Put the fish stock, chicken stock, salt and fish sauce in a nabe pot (or regular pot).  Use a vegetable peeler to turn all of the vegetables except the lotus root into ribbons.  Slice the lotus root thinly.  Bring the stock to a boil and add the vegetables.  Boil the vegetables for 2-3 minutes and serve.  It’s that easy.

Cod and Chinese Cabbage Nabe (Hotpot)

きょうの料理ビギナーズIt’s cold out and it’s now time to bring out the nabe recipes.  Nabe is hotpot in English but since I first encountered it in Japan I can’t seem to refer to it by it’s English name.  There are such a variety of nabe recipes out there.  Last year I bought a cooking magazine exclusively devoted to nabe.  We don’t have a proper pot for nabe (see the magazine cover for a proper one).  You generally make hotpot in a clay pot called donabe (literally clay pot).  I am not allowed to buy a new one until after we move.  I have two individual sized ones but they always boil over on the stove.  I currently make nabe in a regular soup pot.  I also don’t make it on a portable burner that sits on the table.  It’s probably purely out of laziness because we have one somewhere, I think.

This is the nabe recipe magazine I bought last year.  It is from NHK (the national broadcasting corp) and is from a daily tv cooking show called きょうの料理 (kyou no ryouri – today’s food).  It’s a great book with variety and good pictures. Being a beginners book, it has lots of simple food – my favorite kind.

 

 

the meal

This recipe is an original recipe with the topping idea stole from a miso soup recipe from my miso soup cook book (yes, they do exist).

Cod and Chinese Cabbage Nabe

Masa & Kirsten Adachi

Serves two

1/4 Chinese cabbageCod & Chinese Cabbage Nabe

2 cod fillets

2 tablespoons grated daikon (giant white radish)

Soup

2 1/2 cups water

1 piece of dried kombu (kelp)

1 1/2 tablespoons cooking sake

1/2 tablespoon soy sauce

1/2 tablespoon mirin

1/2 teaspoon salt

Put all the soup ingredients in the pot and bring to a boil.  Simmer for 15 minutes.  Add the stalks of the Chinese cabbage and cook for five minutes.  Add the cod and leaves of the Chinese cabbage and cook until tender.  Serve topped with grated daikon.  Soy sauce is a good dipping sauce if you want a stronger flavor.

Cod and Chinese Cabbage Nabe (Hotpot)

きょうの料理ビギナーズIt’s cold out and it’s now time to bring out the nabe recipes.  Nabe is hotpot in English but since I first encountered it in Japan I can’t seem to refer to it by it’s English name.  There are such a variety of nabe recipes out there.  Last year I bought a cooking magazine exclusively devoted to nabe.  We don’t have a proper pot for nabe (see the magazine cover for a proper one).  You generally make hotpot in a clay pot called donabe (literally clay pot).  I am not allowed to buy a new one until after we move.  I have two individual sized ones but they always boil over on the stove.  I currently make nabe in a regular soup pot.  I also don’t make it on a portable burner that sits on the table.  It’s probably purely out of laziness because we have one somewhere, I think.

This is the nabe recipe magazine I bought last year.  It is from NHK (the national broadcasting corp) and is from a daily tv cooking show called きょうの料理 (kyou no ryouri – today’s food).  It’s a great book with variety and good pictures. Being a beginners book, it has lots of simple food – my favorite kind.

 

 

the meal

This recipe is an original recipe with the topping idea stole from a miso soup recipe from my miso soup cook book (yes, they do exist).

Cod and Chinese Cabbage Nabe

Masa & Kirsten Adachi

Serves two

1/4 Chinese cabbageCod & Chinese Cabbage Nabe

2 cod fillets

2 tablespoons grated daikon (giant white radish)

Soup

2 1/2 cups water

1 piece of dried kombu (kelp)

1 1/2 tablespoons cooking sake

1/2 tablespoon soy sauce

1/2 tablespoon mirin

1/2 teaspoon salt

Put all the soup ingredients in the pot and bring to a boil.  Simmer for 15 minutes.  Add the stalks of the Chinese cabbage and cook for five minutes.  Add the cod and leaves of the Chinese cabbage and cook until tender.  Serve topped with grated daikon.  Soy sauce is a good dipping sauce if you want a stronger flavor.