Kabocha and Cheese Pasta

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Two days ago I found this pumpkin macaroni and cheese recipe on the (never home)maker blog and decided it would either be amazing or weird. I had to try it either way. I made it using ingredients common in Japanese supermarkets so cheddar is out. One and a half cups of cheddar would cost an arm and a leg providing you could find it. I used grated pizza cheese which made for a milder flavor. I think next time I will use half pizza cheese and half stronger cheese (my supermarket has reasonable grated Gouda). Despite the mild flavor I loved it. I think it would be best on steamed veggies which is what I’ll try with the leftovers. You can’t actually taste the kabocha in this sauce but it and the chickpea puree add some nutrients.  Not that you can really call this healthy as there is a lot of cheese in it. I usually can’t eat creamy sauces but this one was okay for me – it must have been the kabocha and chickpeas. I’ll just post the ingredients list and you can find the method in the original post here.

Kabocha Cheese Pasta

Serves Two

1-1/2 cups pasta (I used ballerine)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon flour
1/2 cup soy milk (regular would be fine)
1/2 cup kabocha puree (unsweetened)
1-1/2 cups shredded cheese
1/4 cup pureed garbanzo beans
1/2 head broccoli, chopped and steamed
1/2 carrot, diced and steamed
1/8 teaspoon paprika

1/8 teaspoon pepper

The method is here.

4 thoughts on “Kabocha and Cheese Pasta

  1. I’m also scratching my head as I try to figure out whether or not I’m going to like this. Can you find cans of kabocha puree like you can find cans of pumpkin in North America? I’ve only been here two months, so I’m still figuring out the grocery store situation.

    1. It doesn’t actually taste like kabocha so you will probably be okay.

      I have never seen cans of kabocha here. You can microwave it, boil it or bake it. Since it is naturally sweet I usually boil it instead of baking it.

  2. I’m also scratching my head as I try to figure out whether or not I’m going to like this. Can you find cans of kabocha puree like you can find cans of pumpkin in North America? I’ve only been here two months, so I’m still figuring out the grocery store situation.

    1. It doesn’t actually taste like kabocha so you will probably be okay.

      I have never seen cans of kabocha here. You can microwave it, boil it or bake it. Since it is naturally sweet I usually boil it instead of baking it.

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