Udon Salad

20110417-202335.jpg

I love udon but am usually left craving veggies afterward. No need anymore. It’s getting warmer so it’s time to up the raw veggie count. I eat versions of this regularly. You can mix it up with the veggies and noodles. I like soba noodles too.

Udon Salad

One serving
one serving of udon noodles, cooked and chilled
2 lettuce leaves, torn
1/2 carrot, sliced
1/2 cucumber, sliced
1 salad kabu (turnip), sliced
1 small tomato, sliced
10cm celery, sliced

Dressing (three servings)
1 tablespoon ground black sesame seeds
1 tablespoon mirin
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon vinegar (I used malt)
1 tablespoon salad oil (put a splash of sesame oil in the spoon first and fill up with oil)

While the noodles are cooking cut the vegetables and mix the dressing. I put the dressing ingredients in a jar and just gave it a shake.

Put the lettuce in/on your serving dish (I used a ramen bowl) first, then the noodles and top with veggies. Pour about a third of the dressing on top. Serve.

6 thoughts on “Udon Salad

  1. So I took this recipe and made some this morning, unfortunately I did not have any turnip, but I did have some daikon radish. Really great! Thanks for sharing.

  2. Hi Kirsty,

    Your blog has been so super helpful to me — my hubby and I are planning to move to Okayama in July, and this blog has been a major source of inspiration and comfort knowing what is/is not available there.

    I’ve recently become much more interested in whole foods/real foods/raw foods (etc.). I was wondering if you could share where you buy your grains and if you have any tips about buying organic in Japan.

    1. Thanks for stopping by. Are you moving from outside of Japan to Okayama?

      Barley – I buy at the supermarket. It comes in 800g packages. See this post for vocabulary.

      Brown Rice – also from the supermarket

      Oats – nonorganic from Costco (10lbs for 900yen). Organic from import shops (1kg for 900yen).

      Lentils – (not a grain but lovely) mostly from import shops in small packets of about 300g. The Meat Guy sells them in larger bags.

      English friendly online organic food shop: Tengu Natural Foods/Alishan Organics Center

      Raw food blog from Japan: Raw Bento would be great to contact to find more info on raw foods – I just play around with them

      Organic vegetables – my supermarket has a very small corner of them so yours might too. Apparently there are quite a few farmers who farm organically but can’t afford to get certified. When you get to Okayama look for farmers markets and you can ask them. You can probably find organic vegetable boxes online as well. I have never looked for them.

      I would also recommend joining the being-a-broad discussion board. You can ask lots of questions about any part of Japan life there. It is pretty active and there are several vegans, raw foodies, etc. on there.

      1. We live in China right now, but we’re taking a 2 week vacation to the States in July and then going from the States to Okayama…so yes, from outside Japan. Anything you would recommend bringing in that’s really inconvenient/hard to find?

        Thanks for all the helpful info and links! They are going to be a huge help! Is it expensive to get things delivered from online stores like Tengu?

        1. If you use a lot of different spices you might want to bring along your favorites. If your area doesn’t have an import store you may have a poor selection. You can order these online but small bags of spices don’t take up much space. Plus, most spice bottles sold at regular supermarkets are super tiny.

          If you like flax seeds, bring some. They are quite expensive here.

          Decaf tea is hard to find – especially the flavored stuff. You can get some celestial seasonings herbal teas. Decaf instant coffee is most readily found in the maternity section of baby stores.

          Peanut butter and chocolate combinations are pretty much impossible to find.

          Shipping for Tengu natural foods is here. I think that is relatively standard. You can have frozen stuff delivered too. Delivery fees are often by order value so I usually just order a lot at a time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Udon Salad

20110417-202335.jpg

I love udon but am usually left craving veggies afterward. No need anymore. It’s getting warmer so it’s time to up the raw veggie count. I eat versions of this regularly. You can mix it up with the veggies and noodles. I like soba noodles too.

Udon Salad

One serving
one serving of udon noodles, cooked and chilled
2 lettuce leaves, torn
1/2 carrot, sliced
1/2 cucumber, sliced
1 salad kabu (turnip), sliced
1 small tomato, sliced
10cm celery, sliced

Dressing (three servings)
1 tablespoon ground black sesame seeds
1 tablespoon mirin
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon vinegar (I used malt)
1 tablespoon salad oil (put a splash of sesame oil in the spoon first and fill up with oil)

While the noodles are cooking cut the vegetables and mix the dressing. I put the dressing ingredients in a jar and just gave it a shake.

Put the lettuce in/on your serving dish (I used a ramen bowl) first, then the noodles and top with veggies. Pour about a third of the dressing on top. Serve.

6 thoughts on “Udon Salad

  1. So I took this recipe and made some this morning, unfortunately I did not have any turnip, but I did have some daikon radish. Really great! Thanks for sharing.

  2. Hi Kirsty,

    Your blog has been so super helpful to me — my hubby and I are planning to move to Okayama in July, and this blog has been a major source of inspiration and comfort knowing what is/is not available there.

    I’ve recently become much more interested in whole foods/real foods/raw foods (etc.). I was wondering if you could share where you buy your grains and if you have any tips about buying organic in Japan.

    1. Thanks for stopping by. Are you moving from outside of Japan to Okayama?

      Barley – I buy at the supermarket. It comes in 800g packages. See this post for vocabulary.

      Brown Rice – also from the supermarket

      Oats – nonorganic from Costco (10lbs for 900yen). Organic from import shops (1kg for 900yen).

      Lentils – (not a grain but lovely) mostly from import shops in small packets of about 300g. The Meat Guy sells them in larger bags.

      English friendly online organic food shop: Tengu Natural Foods/Alishan Organics Center

      Raw food blog from Japan: Raw Bento would be great to contact to find more info on raw foods – I just play around with them

      Organic vegetables – my supermarket has a very small corner of them so yours might too. Apparently there are quite a few farmers who farm organically but can’t afford to get certified. When you get to Okayama look for farmers markets and you can ask them. You can probably find organic vegetable boxes online as well. I have never looked for them.

      I would also recommend joining the being-a-broad discussion board. You can ask lots of questions about any part of Japan life there. It is pretty active and there are several vegans, raw foodies, etc. on there.

      1. We live in China right now, but we’re taking a 2 week vacation to the States in July and then going from the States to Okayama…so yes, from outside Japan. Anything you would recommend bringing in that’s really inconvenient/hard to find?

        Thanks for all the helpful info and links! They are going to be a huge help! Is it expensive to get things delivered from online stores like Tengu?

        1. If you use a lot of different spices you might want to bring along your favorites. If your area doesn’t have an import store you may have a poor selection. You can order these online but small bags of spices don’t take up much space. Plus, most spice bottles sold at regular supermarkets are super tiny.

          If you like flax seeds, bring some. They are quite expensive here.

          Decaf tea is hard to find – especially the flavored stuff. You can get some celestial seasonings herbal teas. Decaf instant coffee is most readily found in the maternity section of baby stores.

          Peanut butter and chocolate combinations are pretty much impossible to find.

          Shipping for Tengu natural foods is here. I think that is relatively standard. You can have frozen stuff delivered too. Delivery fees are often by order value so I usually just order a lot at a time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *